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Launched:  Gaylesta Project Offering Free Therapy Slots for formerly incarcerated persons.

February 10, 2016 4:53 PM | Jay Philip Paul (Administrator)

Dear Colleagues:
As mentioned in the post-retreat Board report, a Gaylesta team has set up an initiative matching formerly incarcerated people with interested and experienced therapists. We are excited to announce that the project is now under way. The first clients have been matched with therapists – and there are more in the pipeline.


We have now met with three reentry organizations eager to provide clients for services:  Project Rebound, at SF State, Waypass at City College, and the Transgender Justice Institute.

Will you consider providing one or two pro bono slots in your caseload for individuals exiting jail or prison? These would include, but not be limited to LGBTQIA clients.

If you would like to get involved, please contact us with any questions or concerns. To make this work, we would appreciate if you can provide us with the following information to guide us in making a good match:

  1. How many slots can you offer?
  2. At what address will you see clients?
  3. What is your availability? Do you have a specific time or times that you may be available?
  4. Within that framework, do you prefer that we set up the initial meeting, or do you prefer that client contact you to set the first session?
  5. Are there any client characteristics or clinical issues that you feel would make an individual an unsuitable match for you?

 A consultation group will be available if  there is interest.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Judy Siff jsiff@sbcglobal.net 
Nathalie Paven  npaven@earthlink.net
 Did you know that the U.S. has the highest rate of incarceration of any nation in the world (http://www.prisonpolicy.org/global)?  That prisoners in the U.S. are overwhelmingly Black or Brown?  That one in four Black people will be incarcerated in their life?  Sometimes the gravity of social injustice is so vast, that it is difficult to figure out where or how to make a difference. As individuals, many of us choose a path of social justice activism – yet the question remains – is there anything we can do specifically within our profession itself?  Although that is more a statement than a question, this project speaks to utilizing our particular skill set in a meaningful way.